What is the strongest glue in the world?

Barnacle natural glue is stronger than any product for the same purpose that the industry has been able to develop synthetically. It sticks to any surface and in any condition. But since it was first described by Charles Darwin, the formula for its great effectiveness has remained a mystery. Now, scientists at Newcastle University in the UK believe they have uncovered its secrets. They report this in the journal Nature Communications.

The researchers have shown for the first time that barnacle larvae release an oily droplet to clear water from surfaces before sticking with a phosphoprotein adhesive. The findings could pave the way for the development of new synthetic bioadhesives for use in medical implants and microelectronics. The research will also be important in the production of new coatings for ships to prevent crustaceans and mollusks from sticking.

“We have known for some time that there are two components in the bioadhesive, but until now, it was thought that they behaved a bit like some of the synthetic glues, mixing together before hardening. But the question still remains, how does the glue make contact with the surface if it is already covered by water? This is one of the main obstacles to the development of adhesives for underwater applications,” explains Nick Aldred, author of the research.

Barnacles have two larval stages, the nauplius, and the cypris. The nauplius, common to most crustaceans, swims freely once it hatches from the egg shell, feeding on plankton. The final larval stage is the cypris, which is unique to barnacles. It investigates surfaces and selects one that provides suitable conditions for growth. Once it has decided to incorporate permanently, the cypris releases its tail and attaches itself to the surface, where it will live out the rest of its days.

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“Advances in imaging techniques, such as 2-photon microscopy, have made it possible to observe the adhesion process and characterize the two components. We now know that these two substances play very different roles, one in cleaning the surface water and the other in cementing the base of the barnacle,” he continues.

The ocean is a complex mixture of dissolved ions, and the pH varies significantly between geographic areas and, of course, it is wet. Yet, despite these hostile conditions, the barnacle glue is able to stand the test of time. “It’s an incredibly clever natural solution to the problem of how to cope with a water barrier on a surface that is going to change the way we think about the development of biologically inspired adhesives,” stresses the researcher.

STRONGEST GLUE IN THE NATURAL WORLD

The glue that is 90% water and as strong as cartilage.

Mussels and barnacles stick to cliffs, ship hulls, and even whales, just as tendons and cartilage do to the bone.

This is made possible by a natural adhesive, hydrogel, a sticky mixture of water, and rubbery materials that become a robust and flexible substance.

Inspired by this, engineers at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have developed a method to develop a synthetic equivalent to this natural adhesive.

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Not only that, but it is stronger than the natural one.

In an endurance test, they glued the adhesive to a glass plate and hung a 25-kilogram weight on it without breaking the gel. To continue reading, click here.

The glue that is 90% water and as strong as cartilage

The world’s strongest natural glue… peels off

The substance that allows barnacles to adhere to any surface, even when wet, reveals its secrets 150 years after being described by Darwin.

The barnacle’s natural glue is stronger than any product for the same purpose that the industry has been able to develop synthetically. It sticks to any surface and in any condition. But ever since it was first described by Charles Darwin, the formula for its great effectiveness has remained a mystery. Now, scientists at Newcastle University in the UK believe they have uncovered its secrets. They report this in the journal Nature Communications.

Researchers have shown for the first time that barnacle larvae release an oily droplet to clear water from surfaces before sticking with a phosphoprotein adhesive. The findings could pave the way for developing new synthetic bioadhesives for use in medical implants and microelectronics. The ocean is a complex mixture of dissolved ions, and the pH varies significantly between geographic areas and, of course, it is wet. However, despite these hostile conditions, barnacle glue is able to stand the test of time. To continue reading, click here. The world’s strongest natural glue peels off.

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The natural glue with multiple properties

Did you know that the mussel’s natural glue is the strongest in the world? Mitylids, commonly known as mussels, produce silk, “Byssus,” which allows them to adhere to rocks. This adhesive has properties that make scientists dream:

– It is insensitive to temperature variations.
– It is resistant to UV rays and salt.
– It sticks underwater.

A future commercial use

However, today it is not yet used! Fortunately, researchers have studied its properties to try to reproduce its performance. Biomedical engineering professor Phillip Messersmith and his team have succeeded in creating a synthetic version of Byssus.

According to the professor, this adhesive will make it possible to repair bone fractures, reconstruct human body tissues, and suture wounds. Byssus has a bright future; we will hear about this adhesive in scientific journals. Let’s follow its progress.