Where was the first plastic bottle made?

History of the plastic bottle pdf

The announcement of this major technological breakthrough was made in London during a day in which Coca-Cola reinforced its commitments and announced new packaging targets for Western Europe.

In 2017, Coca-Cola launched ‘We Move Forward’, its sustainability strategy for Western Europe which has as its main objective, by 2025, to collect and recycle the equivalent of 100% of the bottles or cans it markets, as well as making all its packaging 100% recyclable and ensuring that its plastic bottles contain at least 50% recycled PET.

Tim Brett, president of The Coca-Cola Company in Western Europe, said: “Too many of the world’s non-renewable resources are currently being thrown away as waste. We know we need to do more to correct this. The targets we have and the targets we have set today are ambitious, and so they should be. Packaging has a valuable function, but it should always be collected, recycled and reused. Our aim, working hand in hand with our partners, is to make the term “single-use plastic” obsolete by making all our plastic and therefore our packaging compliant with the principles of the circular economy.”

See also  Which country has most plastic surgery?

Characteristics of plastic bottles

EnvironmentThe plastic bottle: from miracle vessel to hated wasteThe evolution of the plastic bottle from something incredible to the scourge of the sea and land has happened in a single generation.By Laura ParkerPublished 28 Aug 2019 15:54 CSTIn 2017, one million drinks were bought in plastic bottles every minute. The plastic bottle’s journey from convenience to curse has been rapid: it has happened in a single generation.Photo by Hannah Whitaker, National GeographicArticle created in collaboration with the National Geographic Society.

It’s hard to pinpoint the moment when the modern plastic bottle changed the world’s beverage drinking habits. The day New York supermodels began wearing Evian water bottles as a fashion accessory on runways in the late 1980s was indicative of the future that lay ahead. Billions of bottles were sold with the promise that bottled water was good for the skin and hair, healthier than soft drinks and safer than tap water. And it didn’t take long for consumers to accept the idea that water needed to be available everywhere.

Evolution of the plastic bottle

The existence of bottles is very ancient, there is already evidence of their existence in Ancient Egypt, although with other shapes and materials different from those we have now, for example, clay, goatskin … later appeared the bottles made of glass through the blowing technique.

See also  Is plastic pipe better than copper?

Bottles have undergone a constant evolution over the centuries. The Greeks introduced some variations making these forms made by the Egyptians to become the typical amphorae. Also in Ancient Rome the bottle was used with great assiduity.

During the Middle Ages, due to the stagnation of trade and the fact that glass was a fragile material, other materials such as leather were used to package beverages, reserving glass for delicate pieces.

The plastic bottle began to be used in the 1960s in France and is still the star of bottles today. The advantage over glass lies mainly in the possibility of being able to convert it into any possible shape and, at the same time, it is much more economical.

Who created plastic bottles

“The goals we have and the goals we have set for ourselves today are ambitious, and so they should be. Packaging has a valuable function, but it should always be collected, recycled and reused. Our goal, working hand in hand with our partners, is to make the term ‘single-use plastic’ obsolete by making all our plastic, and therefore our packaging, compliant with the principles of the circular economy,” said Tim Brett, President of The Coca-Cola Company in Western Europe.

See also  Which is better Terraria vs Starbound?

Bruno van Gompel, technical and supply chain director for The Coca-Cola Company in Western Europe, said that “this bottle is a clear example of what can be achieved through partnership and investment in new and revolutionary technologies”.

Coca-Cola has recently created the Packaging Innovation Hub, which aims to accelerate innovation and invest in sustainable packaging solutions in Western Europe, as well as looking at alternative packaging for the future, such as bottles made from paper, biomaterials, even packaging free alternatives such as Freestyle equipment or micro-dosing solutions.