Which country is garbage free?

Countries that recycle the most in Latin America

If you thought that recycling is not as important as it seems, you are wrong, there is already a country that lives thanks to the waste it produces. Sweden currently recycles or reuses 99 percent of its garbage, a figure that improves its own record from 2012, when they reached a staggering 96 percent.

But they are so efficient that almost 800,000 tons of garbage is imported from the UK, Italy, Norway and Ireland. For the Swedes, three tons of burned garbage contain as much energy as one ton of fuel oil. Thanks to this, 950,000 Swedish homes are heated with the energy produced by this system, and 260,000 more are supplied entirely by it.

To better understand the importance of this topic, we will learn about the people in Sweden, how they live, their language, currency, government, population and economy. Sweden is a Nordic country located in the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe. Stockholm has been its permanent capital since 1523.  Sweden, along with Norway, occupies most of the peninsula and is the fifth largest country on the continent.

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How much garbage is in the world 2021

Tests at a school near an e-waste dump in the suburb of Agbogbloshie on the outskirts of Ghana’s capital Accra revealed contamination by lead, cadmium and other health-damaging pollutants more than 50 times above risk-free levels.

Professor Atiemo Sampson, a researcher at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and Ruediger Kuehr of the United Nations University in Germany warn in their study that most of the e-waste from abroad was burned and destroyed without proper safety measures.

However, this is not something that is happening only in Ghana, but in other developing countries such as China, India, Pakistan, Vietnam, Bangladesh and many others, where technological waste dumps are being created, Kuehr lamented.

It is estimated that, for example, 100,000 cell phones may contain about 2.4 kilos of gold, equivalent to $130,000, more than 900 kilos of copper, valued at $100,000, and 25 kilos of silver equal to $27,300.

Countries that generate the most garbage in the world

The Plastic Continent,[1] also known as Trash Island, Toxic Island, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, Pacific Garbage Swirl, Pollution Island, and other similar names, is an area of ocean covered with marine debris and plastics in the central North Pacific Ocean, located between coordinates 135° to 155°W and 35° to 42°N.[2] This oceanic dumping ground is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of suspended plastic and other debris trapped in the currents of the Pac Ocean Gyre.

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This oceanic dumping ground is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of suspended plastic and other debris trapped in the currents of the North Pacific ocean gyre (formed by a vortex of ocean currents).

The existence of the slick was described in 1988 in a publication of the National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States, which was based on results obtained in laboratories in Alaska between 1985 and 1988, which measured floating plastic in the North Pacific Ocean.[5] These laboratories found high concentrations of marine debris fragments accumulated in areas characterized by certain ocean currents.

How much waste each Mexican produces

While Sweden’s focus on not producing waste is the cornerstone of its system, the country’s 32 WTE (waste-to-energy incinerator) stations burn almost as much garbage as the country recycles. But there’s a catch, because about 800,000 tons of garbage is imported from the UK, Italy, Norway and Ireland, as the Swedes are such efficient recyclers that they need to import garbage. The WTE system works on the principle that three tons of burned garbage contains as much energy as one ton of fuel oil. 950,000 Swedish homes are heated with the energy produced by the system, and 260,000 homes are supplied entirely by it.

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By law, there must be recycling stations in every residential area in Sweden. Most Swedes separate all recyclable waste at home, deposit it in special containers in their homes and then take it to the recycling stations.

This Norwegian city has outgrown the capacity to process the waste of its 1.4 million inhabitants and now has to import waste from other countries to feed the plants that generate heat and electricity for the city.