Who invented the plastic in the world?

Why plastic was invented

Plastic is a material made up of organic or synthetic compounds that have the property of being malleable and therefore can be molded into solid objects of various shapes. This property gives plastics a wide variety of applications.[1] Its name derives from plasticity, a property of materials, which refers to the ability to deform without breaking.

In 1839 Goodyear in the United States and Hancock in England developed in parallel the vulcanization of rubber, i.e. the hardening of rubber and its increased resistance to cold. This was the beginning of the commercial success of thermosetting polymers.[8] The plastics industry began with the development of plastics.

The plastics industry begins with the development of the first thermoset plastics by Baekeland in 1909. Baekeland produced the first synthetic polymer and also developed the plastic molding process, which enabled him to produce various articles of commerce. These early plastics were named Bakelite in honor of their discoverer. Bakelite is formed by a condensation reaction of phenol with formaldehyde.[9] Baekeland’s first synthetic polymer is called Bakelite.

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History of plastic in mexico

Humans have manufactured a total of 8.3 billion tons of plastics, a mass equivalent to almost 160,000 ships like the Titanic. Only 9% of this amount is recycled, while 12% is incinerated and 79% accumulates in landfills. Plastic pollution has become one of the most pressing environmental problems of our time, which calls for intensified efforts not only to recycle, but also to reduce its use and replace it with other, more sustainable materials.

But this much-needed trend should not lead us to forget that we owe much of today’s world to plastic. If we enjoy many conveniences today, it is largely thanks to a history that began in 1907 with the invention of the first synthetic plastic: Bakelite. Today we associate it with those old black telephones that were used in the past. And yet it became so ubiquitous that even its inventor stopped short of describing it as “the material of a thousand uses”.

History of plastics timeline

The 5 generations that the world has seen since World War II have lived with an impressive array of plastic products and supplies that have revolutionized the human environment and the ability to interact with the world through the new possibilities of this material.

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Countless are the revolutionary products that plastic and PET have brought with them since their appearance. In this sense, it is very interesting to analyze how the world worked, through its inventions, its materials, its diseases, and how plastic always offered some help or solution, always accessible, always evolving.

The first one is related to the medical field, a sector in which plastic has allowed an impressive evolution; the second one concerns one of the first plastics and its almost unequivocal presence in our homes, and finally, we will talk a little about the advances that plastic meant in the world of entertainment and communications.

Leo baekeland

Humans have produced a total of 8.3 billion tons of plastics, a mass equivalent to almost 160,000 ships like the Titanic. Only 9% of this amount is recycled, while 12% is incinerated and 79% accumulates in landfills. Plastic pollution has become one of the most pressing environmental problems of our time, which calls for intensified efforts not only to recycle, but also to reduce its use and replace it with other, more sustainable materials.

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But this much-needed trend should not lead us to forget that we owe much of today’s world to plastic. If we enjoy many conveniences today, it is largely thanks to a history that began in 1907 with the invention of the first synthetic plastic: Bakelite. Today we associate it with those old black telephones that were used in the past. And yet it became so ubiquitous that even its inventor stopped short of describing it as “the material of a thousand uses”.