What is ecology an interdisciplinary science?

Outline of the interdisciplinary nature of ecology

Ecology evolved from the natural history of the ancient Greek philosophers, such as Hippocrates, Aristotle, and Theophrastus, laying the foundations of ecology in their studies of natural history. The later foundations for modern ecology were laid in the early work of plant and animal physiologists. Evolutionary concepts of adaptation and natural selection became cornerstones of modern ecological theory, transforming it into a more rigorous science in the 19th century. It is closely related to evolutionary biology, genetics and ethology. Understanding how biodiversity affects ecological function is an important area of focus in ecological studies.

Haeckel originally understood ecology as the science that studies the relationships of living things to their environment, but later extended this definition to the study of the characteristics of the environment, which also includes the transport of matter and energy, and their transformation by biological communities.

Transdisciplinary ecology

Interdisciplinarity refers to the association and integration of information provided by various disciplines that, when complemented, allows for broader and more accurate explanatory schemes of any natural phenomenon.

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Auxiliary sciences of ecology Among the most significant are: Geography. Ecology uses geography to learn about the different reliefs and the way in which living beings are distributed in ecosystems. Mathematics.

Ecology is the science that studies the relationship between living beings and the environment in which they develop. It also studies how they are distributed and the reason for their abundance in a given area, and how these properties are affected by the interaction between living beings and the environment in which they develop.

Ecology is the branch of biology that studies the relationships of different living beings among themselves and with their environment: “the biology of ecosystems” (Margalef, 1998, p. 2). Ecology is an interdisciplinary field that includes biology and earth sciences.

Ecology as an integrative and interdisciplinary science pdf

Go to contentThe answer to this question is actually quite simple if we know what we mean when we say that ecology is multidisciplinary. It is said to be multidisciplinary because it is carried out in relation to other sciences, such as biology, mathematics, physics and chemistry. As an example, the application of mathematics is necessary when the biologist is preparing to make a census or in another case, if a cycle is being studied, such as the water cycle, it is necessary to rely a little on chemistry and physics.

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The sciences used and what they are used for are listed below:-Physics: each and every biotic process involves a transfer of energy, including those of bacteria.-Chemistry: each and every metabolic and physiological process depends on a chemical change or reaction.

Interdisciplinarity of ecology with other sciences

Ecology evolved from the natural history of the ancient Greek philosophers, such as Hippocrates, Aristotle and Theophrastus, who laid the foundations of ecology in their studies of natural history. The later foundations for modern ecology were laid in the early work of plant and animal physiologists. Evolutionary concepts of adaptation and natural selection became cornerstones of modern ecological theory, transforming it into a more rigorous science in the 19th century. It is closely related to evolutionary biology, genetics and ethology. Understanding how biodiversity affects ecological function is an important area of focus in ecological studies.

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Haeckel originally understood ecology as the science that studies the relationships of living things to their environment, but later extended this definition to the study of the characteristics of the environment, which also includes the transport of matter and energy, and their transformation by biological communities.