Who is known as the mother of Indian ecology?

Maria Mies

This month of April we want to dedicate a week to all those women who have fought against everything pre-established and who are fascinating women whose biography seems like a movie. Women who make history and whose lives are admirable. Vandana Shiva is one of them. For this and “…for placing women and ecology at the heart of the modern development discourse”, she received the Alternative Nobel Prize in 1993.

Vandana Shiva, Indian ecofeminist, philosopher and anti-globalization activist, was one of the first to denounce the deterioration of the living conditions of women in the Third World caused by bad development. She is a pacifist, a follower of Gandhi, an alternative Nobel laureate and winner of the 1993 Healthy Life Award. She was able to mobilize 5 million farmers in India against the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GAT) and to be at the head of the great mobilization against the globalization of trade in Seattle at the end of 1999. Founder of Navdaya, a women’s social movement to protect the diversity and integrity of livelihoods, especially seeds. Currently her activism is focused on the fight against GMOs.

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Vandana shiva environment

Vandana Shiva (in Hindi, वंदना शिवा; Dehradun, November 5, 1952) is an Indian physicist, philosopher and writer. An activist for ecofeminism, she received the Well-Earned Livelihood Award-also called the Alternative Nobel Prize-in 1993.

Shiva studied physics at Panjab University in Chandigarh and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1972.[3] After a brief stint at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, she moved to Canada where she obtained a Master’s degree in Philosophy of Science from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada in 1976. In 1979 the University of Western Ontario – awarded him a Ph.D. for a thesis entitled “Hidden Variables and Locality in Quantum Theory.”[4][5][6][6][7][8][8][8][9][9

In 1982 he created the Foundation for Scientific, Technological and Ecological Research, which counts among its initiatives the promotion and dissemination of ecological agriculture (Navdanya program), the study and maintenance of biodiversity (Seed University, International College for Sustainable Living), encouraging the commitment of women to the environmental movement (Mujeres Diversas por la Diversidad), or the regeneration of democratic sentiment (Movimiento Democracia Viva).

Indian woman activist

A role that the United Nations (UN) already recognized in 1995 during the Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing. There, three strategic objectives were established with regard to women and the environment:

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In 1962 Carson, an American biologist and conservationist, published Silent Spring, a work in which she addressed the devastating consequences of the use of pesticides on wildlife and which contributed to the awakening of environmental awareness. Thanks to her, Earth Day was also celebrated and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was developed.

In 2004, this Kenyan biologist, also known as Tree Woman, received the Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to sustainable development.  This award, the first for an African woman, was the culmination of a career that began in 1977 when she founded the Green Belt Movement, whose aim was to combat desertification, deforestation, the water crisis and rural famine.

Ecofeminism

Vandana Shiva (in Hindi, वंदना शिवा; Dehradun, November 5, 1952) is an Indian physicist, philosopher and writer. An activist for ecofeminism, she received the Well-Earned Livelihood Award-also called the Alternative Nobel Prize-in 1993.

Shiva studied physics at Panjab University in Chandigarh and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1972.[3] After a brief stint at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, she moved to Canada where she obtained a Master’s degree in Philosophy of Science from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada in 1976. In 1979 the University of Western Ontario – awarded him a Ph.D. for a thesis entitled “Hidden Variables and Locality in Quantum Theory.”[4][5][6][6][7][8][8][8][9][9][9

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In 1982 he created the Foundation for Scientific, Technological and Ecological Research, which counts among its initiatives the promotion and dissemination of ecological agriculture (Navdanya program), the study and maintenance of biodiversity (Seed University, International College for Sustainable Living), encouraging the commitment of women to the environmental movement (Mujeres Diversas por la Diversidad), or the regeneration of democratic sentiment (Movimiento Democracia Viva).